“Drawing is a process of observation. It's primary function is to challenge preconceptions (memory and signification) - to refine and expand ability (capactiy) to perceive.The signification of our objects as symbols to incorporate them into our lives effectively; the daily grind can “mute” or “freeze” what i consider mercurial reality - context is ever shifting. So by drawing, The goal: to integrate original, singular experiences. The act of curdling practical perception from objective reality is a physiologic one — processed by the body/brain in an emotionally visceral response. By displaying the residue of my experience and some of the procedure I employ in my response to it, I attempt to create an opportunity for shared empathetic experience of seeing something anew, that labels might fall away, and somehow experience an emotional response (receptive cathexis) (un-un-concealing) similar to mine when I experience the mundane singularly (the function of drawing). With the Bronx Museum installation, “Insula,” I experimented with the video, the obfuscation elements (kinetic objects) and window treatment based on the requirements of the site. I hope to create an experience for participants that is difficult to categorize, or label - and the procedural nature of it ensures that no label will suffice for more than a day. By walking through the space, the viewer obfuscates some video signals, allowing others to fill user’s shadows.Darcy Dahl While the “interactive” nature of this can be an entertaining diversion for some, this aspect is not important to me. If the interactive element is stressed it may become the “nature of the work” it is very important to stress that what is important to me is coming to the piece anew with each visit, or pass-by. My goal, and it is a circuitous one, is to “project” a participant into engaging this work in a way that is analogous to my attempted mode of perception while i draw the figure. The video begins with scans of drawings. This brings us full circle. It is very important to me that drawings are not perceived as “entertainment” my goal is that viewers of my drawings experience not fetishistic voyeurism or infatuation with my “process.” I want people to experience the “quietness:” the absence of will, and ego i experience when I attempt the challenging of my perception by drawing the figure. In this, video is an extension of my observation of the figure. It is how I “draw.” “Drawing is procedural observation. It’s product is residual of correction or corroboration. It's primary function is to challenge preconceptions (memory’s bastard) by refining and expanding capacity to perceive. While signification of perceptual data into individually differentiated (unique) symbols is an essential survival mechanism, this mechanism “mutes” or “freezes” mercurial, contextually shifting, reality. Work Statement: Through “Insula,” Dahl’s 3-month long, 24-hrs a day procedural installation at the Bronx Museum, NY, the artist attempts the epistemological: opportunity for cathexis analogous to his engagement with his subject matter: detritus of observation. De-emphasis of the figurative product while encouraging resolution of intersecting layering of cyclically sequential rendering of visual and aural data (observed figure/drawing/scanned drawings/animated scans/installation/video of installation/drawings from installation/painting/scans of painting...repeat) turns the form inside out, revealing the peristaltic undulating viscera of the process of experience projected into a space populated with kinetic semi-opaque objects (e.g. - the homunculus) and observers. The exhibition takes it title from a region of the brain that hypothetically integrates observation, emotion and reason. Technical Statement: The video content of the supplied DVD is part attempted edification of my process made manifest in my last solo show at the Bronx Museum: “Insula,” and part extension of the work. Being mostly concerned with matters of epistemology, I consider the process of “seeing” the only essential “product.” I hope to perpetuate a chain reaction of qualitative change in perceptual processes by displaying my “detritus of observation,” including this text, the content of the dvd, and the installation it “documents.” I hope that interacting with the detritus will increase the acuity of subsequent interactions. That life will be qualitatively more engaging having tripped over something that forces you to look at it because of the ambiguity it’s transitory nature instills. The content of this DVD is a representation of my process of learning to see and how i organize that information in order to expand the inevitable categorization. It is an attempt to perpetuate singular mundanities. Much like the memory of having seen the installation is a byproduct of an experience. It’s the quality of the state of observation that is essential. The act of observing should be an act of experiencing the temporal singularity of each experience - of being at one with your surroundings. My work is an attempt at one, documenting my relationship to my surrounds, and two creating instances for observation (ie - singular experiences) in others. My work should allow an observer to forget my work, but Subsequently, the multilayered drawings are further processed temporally by using the value data of to displace the images over time, resulting in an undulating or peristaltic motion. The exhibition takes it title from the limbic part of the brain that hypothetically integrates emotion and reason. the shifting illumination of forms presents a visual experience that is constantly in flux. “The object of drawing is, for me as an artist, is firstly, to see: to challenge my perceptions - to refine and expand my ability to perceive. We assume objects as symbols to incorporate them into our lives effectively; the daily grind can “mute” or “freeze” what i consider mercurial reality - context is ever shifting. So by drawing, I am not just “seeing” an object anew - I aim for original, singular experiences. The act of curdling practical perception from objective reality is a physiologic one—processed by the body/brain in an emotionally visceral response. By displaying the residue of my experience and some of the procedure I employ in digesting my response to it, I attempt to create an opportunity to an empathic experience of seeing something anew, that labels might fall away, and somehow experience an emotional response (receptive cathexis) similar to mine when I experience the mundane singularly (the function of drawing). With the Bronx Museum installation, “Insula,” I experimented with the video, the obfuscation elements (kinetic objects) and window treatment based on the requirements of the site. I hope to create an experience for participants that is difficult to categorize, or label - and the procedural nature of it ensures that no label will suffice for more than a day. By walking through the space, the viewer obfuscates some video signals, allowing others to fill user’s shadows. While the “interactive” nature of this can be an entertaining diversion for some, this aspect is not important to me. If the interactive element is stressed it may become the “nature of the work” it is very important to stress that what is important to me is coming to the piece anew with each visit, or pass-by. My goal, and it is a circuitous one, is to “project” a participant into engaging this work in a way that is analogous to my attempted mode of perception while i draw the figure. The video begins with scans of drawings. This brings us full circle. It is very important to me that drawings are not perceived as “entertainment” my goal is that viewers of my drawings experience not fetishistic voyeurism or infatuation with my “process.” I want people to experience the “quietness:” the absence of will, and ego i experience when I attempt the challenging of my perception by drawing the figure. In this, video is an extension of my observation of the figure. It is how I “draw.” I am now engaging in drawings, video and paintings based upon this Animations representative of his processing of his observations human figure project Hyperbolic antecedent insignia of luscious fronds submitted for the sublimation of toxic play. Tempered enthusiasm for the hideous praise of somnolent homunculi modeling of our neurological will. This better work this time. Inspired by Lon Chaney Jr., Darcy Dahl experienced his first commercial success in the realm of visual art by trading drawings of the wolfman to a fellow elementary school student for G.I. Joe figurines. Television was an early influence. It's influence continues today. CSPAN providing a barrage of posable figurines. Beginning in 1998 he began layering images on top of one another in an attempt to capture the violent capricious choreography in boxing. This resulted in layering many marks on top of one another - the technique extended into his formal study of the human figure , eventually extending into color studies, painting and video. Darcy met Jack Swanson during his first year of his preparation for the Seminary at Golden Valley Lutheran College. With Swanson he wrestled with shedding his appropriation of modern masters - Duchamp, deKooning, Cage, the futurists. He also met and befriended Herbert Loddigs, who's theology freed him from a obligation to pursue an anemic faith for the one that sustained - grace is a concept that drives all his work. The rest of college was spent skipping classes in order to attend every available figure drawing lab. David Feinberg afflicted him with the imperative of color's affect. Passionate since highschool about psychology and mental health issues, he has spent the last two years reconciling neurolingustic programing, Rogerian therapy and the act of making and viewing art as a kind of "client-centered" approach to organizing data on the painted surface. In 2004, after 15 years in the broadcast / interactive video field, Darcy turned his office into a studio, moved to the south bronx and returned to painting full time (having studied painting and computer/interactive arts at University of Minnesota and Minneapolis College of art and Design).  Since then he has been in several group shows and solo shows in New York City.  He is now utilizing his years spent doing commercial video and studies of human figure in a process culminating in visceral expression on paper, canvas, video and installation in a cirucuitous process where finished “product” settles only briefly before being agitated by the process of excoriating the infinite singularity of the mundane from the application of his anachronistic will to label. SOLO EXHIBITIONS: 2008 - “INSULA” Video Installation - Bronx Museum Project Space 2006 - “GRACE (in vitro)” – Haven Arts Gallery GROUP EXHIBITIONS: 2008 - “SOLOS” - Haven Arts Gallery 2008 - “LOCAL” - Haven Arts Gallery 2007 - “BEST OF THE BRONX” -Krasdale Gallery 2007 - “SKETCH DETAIL” Ryan Chelsea Clinton Health Center 2006 - “EVERY DAY IS LIKE SUNDAY” - Longwood Art Gallery 2006 - “THEN AND NOW” - Haven Arts Gallery 2006 - “10 CURATORIAL PERSPECTIVES” - Haven Arts Gallery 2005 - “SPECIAL COLLECTION” – Mott Haven NYP Library 2005 - ”NEXT STOP 138” – Haven Arts Gallery philter philter philter ilublo logo residue

darcy dahl